Are Squirrel Droppings Dangerous?

Squirrels coexist peacefully with humans for the most part and rarely attack unless rabid or cornered. Many homeowners, however, don’t appreciate the risk involved with having squirrel feces and urine in your home. You don’t need to be attacked by the animal for it to be dangerous.

Squirrel droppings and urine harbour many potential diseases. The three common diseases you are likely to contract from contact with infected squirrel feces are Tularemia, Salmonellosis and Leptospirosis.

There are additional diseases that you may not get from the feces but are still a major concern any time squirrels or wildlife is present in your home. These are Lyme disease and Rabies. Read this infographic to learn about squirrel removal and how to deal with squirrel droppings.

An infographic by Squirrel Control.

Foods you can and can’t share with your dog

Did you ever just took the food off your plate and shared it with your dog? It can be any vegetable, fruit, chocolate, dairy food or any other food that you love.

Well, I am sure you did. In fact, most of us do that! We love our furry friend and it’s quite obvious we want to share our favorite food with them.

However, do you know not all the foods we share with them are good for them? In fact, some of them are life-threatening, for example, Xylitol.

So, what is the deal? Which ones are safe and which ones are good to be fed?

First thing first, talking about the safe foods that you can feed your dog are fish, egg, rice, cooked shrimp, carrot, apple, blueberries, cucumber, mangoes, turkey, celery, honey, watermelon, pear, pineapple, potatoes, plain yogurt and some other.

Banana, strawberries, orange, broccoli, raspberries, coconut, kiwi, oatmeal, pork, bread, popcorn, corn are also safe for your dog but they should be fed in moderation.

Dairy products like milk, cheese is better to be avoided or at least should be fed very limited. Tomatoes, spinach, mints, cherries, raw chicken bone, bacon fall into the same category.

So, which ones are toxic?

Avocado, grapes, onions, chocolates, ice cream, mushroom, nuts, ham bones, xylitol, fruit pits, alcohol and green tomatoes are very dangerous for your dog’s health.

Take a look at the infographic designed by Feed Fond for a better picture of what food you can share with your dog and what you should not.

An infographic by Feed Fond.

30 Day Workout Guide for Dogs (How To Build Muscle) #infographic

As any personal trainer worth their salt will tell you, to stay fit you need to combine several types of exercises that will help you work out all your body. You would need to do cardio training, strength and balance exercises, etc. But even if you do all that, you won’t achieve your goals unless you do them regularly. And if this works for you, the same applies to your dog.

In this infographic by Bully Max, you will find a 30-day guide to help your dog get fit and build muscle. By following it, your dog will be able to train and perfect its physical abilities with several different activities. To keep progressing it’s important to exercise regularly and follow the training calendar, including the resting days. Finally, to make both your experiences better, you can take the chance to train alongside your dog. That way you will become a very healthy couple.

An infographic by Bully Max .

Feeding recommendations for pets #infographic

We all love our pets for the affection, company, and fun they provide. However, it is important to remember that they are living creatures that need our attention and depend on us for their wellbeing. Taking good care of our pets comes with many responsibilities. The most important among them is ensuring they have an appropriate diet. Fulfilling the nutritional needs of cats and dogs is crucial to their health, development, and energy.

The most basic elements of a dog or a cat’s diet are proteins and, therefore, fats. This translates in that both these types of animals need predominantly meat-based diets. However, the required protein intake depends on the age, weight, activity level, pregnancy, etc. That’s why Zoo-Bio.co.uk has prepared this infographic on the feeding recommendations for pets. By following the featured charts, you will know exactly how many calories to feed your pet daily. Consequently, you will be able to enjoy your life with a loving, healthy four-legged friend by your side.

An infographic by Zoo-Bio.co.uk.

Pet and Human Development #Infographic

Cats and dogs are unique and special creatures in many ways but when it comes to their development they have a lot of similarities with each other, and even with their owners!
Pets with educated owners often live longer and have a better quality of life, so read the tips below for each life stage and see what you learn.

Infant
Just like human babies, kittens and puppies need a lot of sleep to aid their muscle and brain development; a newborn kitten typically spends 90% of their day sleeping – almost 22 hours!

Adult
In their adult years, feeding your cat or dog a balanced diet and engaging them in regular exercise or interactive play can help prevent common health problems like obesity.
Dogs typically require around 20 minutes to 2 hours of exercise a day depending on their breed, consult your vet for more advice if you’re worried your dog may be overweight.

Senior
During later life, cats, dogs and humans can face similar health issues including diabetes, arthritis and kidney problems. MedicAnimal has created a specially tailored range of senior dog food and senior cat food to help stave off these common issues.

Find out more in the visual below:

An infographic by MedicAnimal.